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Chinese New Year Blog Postings


Here are the latest articles and postings about Chinese New Year from our holiday blog site Holiday Rap.

(February 03) Today we?re celebrating . . . Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year
Gung Hay Fat Choy! The first day of the Chinese lunar calendar is a very important holiday to the Chinese people. It is celebrated worldwide, wherever there are large Chinese populations, with food, festivities, fireworks, and parades.

There are 12 cycles to the Chinese lunar calendar, each represented by an animal. This year, 2011, is the year of the Rabbit.”

It is common to give red packets to children during this period of celebration. The red envelopes contain money, which should be of an even number (as odd numbers are associated with money given during funerals).

And for your enjoyment here is a short video of the Chinese New Years parade in New York City’s Chinatown. This will give you a brief flavor of the festivities and fun.

Visit our Chinese New Year celebration for more info and fun – Chinese New Year on the Net

photo credit: via flickr

Holiday Invite: Chinese New Year on the Net

chineseny

Xin Ni n Ku i L ! Happy Chinese New Year!

Holidays on the Net is delighted to invite you to join our celebration of one of the world’s biggest New Year’s parties: Chinese New Year. From Bangkok to San Francisco’s Chinatown, the Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, is the pinnacle celebration for billions of Chinese around the world.

Come discover the history of Chinese New Year, including the special traditions and superstitions such as bidding farewell to the Kitchen Gods and giving Red Envelopes stuffed with money to children. Uncover the origins of each of the fifteen days of the Chinese New Year — like do you know why the seventh day of the festival is considered the Birthday of Man?

We also go in-depth into the ancient Chinese zodiac, the 12-year cycle that restarts each New Year. Learn about the Chinese horoscopes associated with each of the 12 years of the Zodiac, especially the qualities of anyone born this year — the Year of the Rabbit! (Of course, we’ve got it all for you, from the Year of the Rat to the Year of the Boar.) Once you have read up on all the facts and figures of Chinese New Year, come flex your trivia muscle at our fun Did You Know feature. We’ve got factoids the whole family will enjoy!

Do you want plan to celebrate the Chinese New Year in your own home this year? Then you will definitely want to check out our article on traditional Chinese New Year foods. Food plays a central role in all Chinese holidays — and the Spring Festival is no exception. We explain the symbolism of various foods and offer suggestions on how to prepare these culinary omens.

Help your little ones appreciate the spirit of Chinese New Year with our fun crafts, coloring pages and other goodies. And finally, don’t forget to wish your friends and family a Xin Ni n Ku i L by sending one of our free Chinese New Year e-cards.

Chinese New Year begins this Thursday, February 03, 2011. I look forward to seeing you soon.

Gong Xi Fa C i,

Louie and the Holiday Elves

Did You Know? Chinese New Year (02/03)

dyk-chin
Did You Know?
February 03

It’s The Chinese New Year!!

Thanks for joining us as we counted down to the Chinese New Year.

Gong Xi Fa C i,
Louie and the Holiday Elves

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to Chinese New Year (02/02)

dyk-chin

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures & Folklore
about the Chinese New Year

Feb. 02 : 01 Day to Chinese NY

Did you know that the Chinese concept of time is cyclical rather than linear?

Each year in the Chinese calendar is ascribed to one of 12 animals signs, which repeats itself every 12 years. This cycle is known as the Sheng xiao, or the Chinese Zodiac. These animals signs are the rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, ram, monkey, rooster, dog and boar.

This year, 2011, will be celebrated as the Year of the Rabbit.

From Bangkok to New York’s Chinatown, the Chinese New Year is the pinnacle celebration for billions of Chinese people around the world. The Chinese New Year is the most important and elaborate holiday in Chinese culture. More than any other Chinese holiday, the New Year stresses the importance of familial ties. Whether it’s family gatherings or citywide celebrations, the New Year is a time rich in traditions and ancient superstitions

Chinese New Year 2011, the Year of the Rabbit, begins on February 03rd and continues for 15 days, through the end of the full moon.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Holiday Reminder: Valentine?s Day 2011

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Holiday Reminder:
Valentine’s Day will be celebrated on Monday February 14th, 2010.

For more info visit our Valentine’s Day celebration – Amore’ on the Net

Did You Know? Countdown to Chinese New Year (02/01)

dyk-chin

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures & Folklore
about the Chinese New Year

Feb. 01 : 02 Days to Chinese NY

Did you know that the color, shape or even name of a food may grant it special culinary significance during the Chinese New Year?

Foods whose names are a homonym for an auspicious wish during the New Year are featured prominently. Whole fish are often eaten, for example, since the Chinese word for fish yu, which is a homonym for abundance.

From Bangkok to New York’s Chinatown, the Chinese New Year is the pinnacle celebration for billions of Chinese people around the world. The Chinese New Year is the most important and elaborate holiday in Chinese culture. More than any other Chinese holiday, the New Year stresses the importance of familial ties. Whether it’s family gatherings or citywide celebrations, the New Year is a time rich in traditions and ancient superstitions

Chinese New Year 2011, the Year of the Rabbit, begins on February 03rd and continues for 15 days, through the end of the full moon.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to Chinese New Year (01/31)

dyk-chin

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures & Folklore
about the Chinese New Year

Jan. 31 : 03 Days to Chinese NY

Did you know that each of the first seven days of the Chinese New Year is associated with the birthday of a specific animal?

The first day is the birthday of the chicken, the second is the birthday of the dog; the third is pig and the fourth is the sheep. The birthday of the ox and cattle is celebrated on the fifth day, while the horse’s birthday is the sixth day. The seventh day is known as the birthday of man, on which all Chinese traditionally celebrate their birthday and become a year older.

From Bangkok to New York’s Chinatown, the Chinese New Year is the pinnacle celebration for billions of Chinese people around the world. The Chinese New Year is the most important and elaborate holiday in Chinese culture. More than any other Chinese holiday, the New Year stresses the importance of familial ties. Whether it’s family gatherings or citywide celebrations, the New Year is a time rich in traditions and ancient superstitions

Chinese New Year 2011, the Year of the Rabbit, begins on February 03rd and continues for 15 days, through the end of the full moon.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to Chinese New Year (01/30)

dyk-chin

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures & Folklore
about the Chinese New Year

Jan. 30 : 04 Days to Chinese NY

Did you know that on the fifth day of the Chinese New Year, a holiday known as Jie Cai Ceng, or the Welcoming of the Gods of Wealth, is celebrated?

Many Chinese take vacation through the fifth day of New Year festival. Merchants, on the other hand, often return to work on Jie Cai Ceng, saying special prayers for the financial success of their business in the coming year.

From Bangkok to New York’s Chinatown, the Chinese New Year is the pinnacle celebration for billions of Chinese people around the world. The Chinese New Year is the most important and elaborate holiday in Chinese culture. More than any other Chinese holiday, the New Year stresses the importance of familial ties. Whether it’s family gatherings or citywide celebrations, the New Year is a time rich in traditions and ancient superstitions

Chinese New Year 2011, the Year of the Rabbit, begins on February 03rd and continues for 15 days, through the end of the full moon.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to Chinese New Year (01/29)

dyk-chin

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures & Folklore
about the Chinese New Year

Jan. 29 : 05 Days to Chinese NY

Did you know that youngsters traditionally receive a gift of money from their parents or other elders on Chinese New Year?

The money, an omen of good luck for the coming year, is presented in a red envelope decorated with gold symbols of good fortune. Called Lai See, a red envelope is also traditionally given to couples on their wedding day and to children on their birthdays.

From Bangkok to New York’s Chinatown, the Chinese New Year is the pinnacle celebration for billions of Chinese people around the world. The Chinese New Year is the most important and elaborate holiday in Chinese culture. More than any other Chinese holiday, the New Year stresses the importance of familial ties. Whether it’s family gatherings or citywide celebrations, the New Year is a time rich in traditions and ancient superstitions

Chinese New Year 2011, the Year of the Rabbit, begins on February 03rd and continues for 15 days, through the end of the full moon.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to Chinese New Year (01/28)

dyk-chin

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures & Folklore
about the Chinese New Year

Jan. 28 : 06 Days to Chinese NY

Did you know that the Chinese New Year lasts for 15 days ?

The holiday begins on the new moon of the first lunar month of the year. It continues through the start of the full moon. The biggest celebrations during the festival are on the eve of the first day and the last full day.

From Bangkok to New York’s Chinatown, the Chinese New Year is the pinnacle celebration for billions of Chinese people around the world. The Chinese New Year is the most important and elaborate holiday in Chinese culture. More than any other Chinese holiday, the New Year stresses the importance of familial ties. Whether it’s family gatherings or citywide celebrations, the New Year is a time rich in traditions and ancient superstitions

Chinese New Year 2011, the Year of the Rabbit, begins on February 03rd and continues for 15 days, through the end of the full moon.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)







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