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Seven Days of Kwanzaa Celebration

Since Kwanzaa is a relatively new holiday, you and your family can use great creativity in you observance of the holiday. Set up an area in your home for the Kwanzaa altar or table. Decorate your home in the same spirit as other holidays. Create posters and banners to hang on the walls, add African sculptures or other artwork. Crafts and decorations can be created to be used in your Kwanzaa display.


Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa represents a different principle of the Nguzo Saba (Seven Principles). When a new candle is lit each day it represents one of these principles.


Many families give the honor of lighting the candles to the youngest child. Some to the eldest family member. Others might have a different family member lighting the candles each night.




The First Day of Kwanzaa (December 26)


On the first day of Kwanzaa the black candle is lit in the Kinara. The black candle represents the first principle - Umoja (oo-MOH-jah): Unity. The person who lights the candle might make a statement about the first principle and its meaning. Sometimes a passage or poem is read relating to what the principle means and how it relates to their life.


Then the Umoja (Unity Cup) might be filled with fruit juice and shared among those gathered. Each takes a drink and passes to the next.


Some families prefer to use a Unity cup for each member, or the cup can just be left in the center of the Kwanzaa table.


After the sharing of the Unity cup the candles are extinguished till the next day.





The Second Day of Kwanzaa (December 27)


On the second day the black candle is again lit, as well as the farthest red candle on the left. This represents the 2nd principle of Kwanzaa - Kujichagulia (koo-jee-chah-goo-LEE-ah): Self-Determination.


Again a statement about the second principle and its meaning might be made. Or possibly a passage or poem is spoken or read which relates to what the principle means and how it relates to their life. The family shares the Unity cup and the candles are extinguished.




The Third Day of Kwanzaa (December 28)


On the third day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, and then the farthest right green candle. This represents the 3rd principle of Kwanzaa - Ujima (oo-JEE-mah): Collective work and responsibility.


The third principle is discussed. The family shares the Unity cup and the candles are extinguished.




The Fourth Day of Kwanzaa (December 29)


On the fourth day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, the farthest right green. And then the next red candle on the left. This represents the 4th principle of Kwanzaa - Ujamaa (oo-jah-MAH): Collective economics.


The fourth principle is discussed. The family shares the Unity cup and the candles are extinguished.




The Fifth Day of Kwanzaa (December 30)


On the fifth day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, the farthest right green, the next red and then the next green candle. This represents the 5th principle of Kwanzaa - Nia (NEE-ah): Purpose.


The fifth principle is discussed. The family shares the Unity cup and the candles are extinguished.




The Sixth Day of Kwanzaa (December 31)


On the sixth day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, the farthest right green, the next red, the next green and then the final red candle. This represents the 6th principle of Kwanzaa - Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah): Creativity.


The sixth day, which occurs on New Years Eve, is a special day. This is the day of the Kwanzaa Karamu or Kwanzaa Feast. In the spirit of celebration many families invite their friends and family to join in the festivities.


Create a party atmosphere with additional Kwanzaa decorations. Dress up in traditional or traditional inspired clothing. Play African or African American music. Cook your favorite foods and special holiday dishes. Invite your guests to contribute to the feast by bringing along their favorite dishes. The children and/or the Adults can perform plays, read uplifting passages, poems or stories. Maybe one of the adults will be a story teller for the day. Remember the principle of the day is Kuumba (creativity). So be creative!!


On this special day we remember our ancestors when the Unity cup is shared. After everyone has taken a drink the candles are extinguished.


But before the Karamu is over, the eldest member of those present will read the Tamshi La Tutaonana (TAM-shi la Tu-ta-u-NA-na). The Tamshi La Tutaonana was written by Dr. Karenga, the creator of Kwanzaa, as a farewell statement to the feast and the year.


Everyone stands as the elder reads:


Strive for discipline, dedication, and achievement in all you do. Dare struggle and sacrifice and gain the strength that comes from this. Build where you are and dare leave a legacy that will last as long as the sun shines and the water flows. Practice daily Umoja, Kujichagulia, Ujima, Ujamaa, Nia, Kuumba, and Imani. And may the wisdom of the ancestors always walk with us. May the year's end meet us laughing, and stronger. May our children honor us by following our example in love and struggle. And at the end of next year, may we sit together again, in larger numbers, with greater achievement and closer to liberation and a higher level of life.


Then the elder leads the guests in the Harambee (ha-RAM-bee) salute. Each person raises their right fist about as high as their shoulder, then pulls down forcefully until the elbow is next to next to their torso, saying "Harambee!" This is done seven times in unison.


This concludes the Karamu celebration.




The Seventh Day of Kwanzaa (January 1)


On the seventh day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, the farthest right green, the next red candle, the next green, the final red and then the final green candle. This represents the 7th principle of Kwanzaa - Imani (ee-MAH-nee): Faith.


The seventh principle is discussed. The family shares the Unity cup and all seven candles are extinguished. Kwanzaa is over.


Since Kwanzaa is a relatively new holiday, you and your family can use your creativity and imagination when deciding how to celebrate the holiday. Over time you and your family will establish your own traditions that can be enjoyed each year as well as passed on to the next generations.





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Related Articles:
The Symbols of Kwanzaa
Kwanzaa Craft Projects, Coloring Pictures & Other Goodies
When is Kwanzaa? (2008-2020)
Did You Know? (Kwanzaa)
Lighting The Kinara





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