Buddha Tibetan Thangka Thanka Painting Nepal Gold & Pigments Kalachakra Mandala


Buddha Tibetan Thangka Thanka Painting Nepal Gold & Pigments Kalachakra Mandala

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Buddha Tibetan Thangka Thanka Painting Nepal Gold & Pigments Kalachakra Mandala:
$451


Buddha Tibetan Thangka Thanka Painting Nepal Gold & Pigments Kalachakra Mandala. Condition is New. Shipped with USPS First Class Package.

Signed by:Dil Lama

Painting Quality:Authentic/original hand painted Newari painting natural pigment and 24 kt Gold (long lasting)

Size:H 18-1/2” – W 18-3/4”

Description (main):Kalachakra Mandala

Description details:This is a beautiful all original 24 K Gold Thangka Painting from Nepal. I brought it back with me from my last trip there.Amazing colors and details and the canvas is super clean.

No flaws.

Important to recognize the quality of the painting:

1 – Student

2 – Teacher (professional)

3 – Lama (masters)

4 – Dalai Lama (masters of masters)

You can discern the skill of the artist by looking closely at the lines, such as those used to make waves, clouds, and the faces of people, deities, and animals. The finer and clearer the lines, the greater the skill involved.

This will drive the beauty and precision of the painting as well as the price. So look very closely, request close ups and admire the holiness, the details and precision of this meditated painting process, the eyes are generally great indicators, the ratio of buddha’s faces and such. A thangka with large figures, animals is easier and faster to create than a mandala, wheel of life or Buddha’s life thangkas due to the quantity of details throughout the painting. This is such an amazing art that once you acquire one, most of you will look at expanding your collection.

If you are also interested in a different style, color, want it to be framed with the famous embroidered silk, please ask. Below, I also attached a bit more about the history and the process of such a magnificent piece of art called the THANGKA.

Please enjoy the reading and the viewing!

History

Tibetan Buddhist painting developed from widespread traditions of early Buddhist paintings which now only survive in a few sites such as theAjanta Cavesin India and theMogao Caveson theSilk Road, which has very extensive wall-paintings and was the repository for what are now the earliest surviving Tibetan paintings on cloth. The thanka form developed alongside the tradition ofTibetan Buddhist wall paintings, which are or were mostly in monasteries.

The early history of the form is more easily traced through these murals, which survive in greater numbers than the portable paintings which certainly once existed.[2]Most thanka were commissioned by individuals, who were believed to acquire merit by doing so. They might then be given to a monastery or another individual, or retained for use by the commissioner. Some thangka have inscriptions on their back recording that they were the personal meditation image (thugs dam) of a notable monk.[3]Most artists were probably monks, although lay artists seem to have existed, as they did for metalwork sculpture. The commissioner would provide the materials, which were often valuable, and by tradition the compensation to the artist was regarded as a "gift" rather than a fee.The word "thangka" means "thing that one unrolls" inClassical Tibetan.[5]Thangka are very rarely signed, but some artists are known, more because they were important monastic leaders than famous as artists. Painting was a valued accomplishment in a monk.[6]

The earliest survivals of Tibetan paintings on cloth are in some pieces from the Mogao Caves atDunhuangon the Silk Road, inGansuprovince, China. The "Library Cave" there was a repository of old or worn out manuscripts, paintings, prints, textiles and other items which was sealed off in the 11th century, after several centuries of deposits. Many of the paintings have Tibetan inscriptions or are in a style that can be recognized as Tibetan, as opposed to the dominant Chinese style and some pieces reflecting Indian styles.[7]Though they are hard to date, it is thought that these pieces mainly come from a period c. 781–848 when the area was ruled by Tibet.[8]

Surviving tangkas on cloth certainly from Tibet itself start in the 11th century, after the revival of Buddhism; there are some 20 surviving from this and the 12th century.[9]Such early examples typically have compositions that are already complex, but less so than in later examples. As later the typical compositions shows a central figure flanked by smaller other figures, often in framed compartments, or surrounded by flaming halos or seated on small clouds. Behind these figures a landscape background including much sky is often indicated, though little of it may be visible. The central figure may be a deity, andarhat, or an important monk, and the same groups make up the background figures. Several of the figures may be different "aspects" or reincarnations of each other according to Buddhist theology. In the example at left the flankingbodhisattvasare in a style, one of several found in such figures in this period, that appears derived from central Indian art.[10]

Over the following centuries Tibetan painting, both on walls and thangka, continued to develop in its distinctive style, balancing between the two major influences of Indo-Nepalese andChinese painting, despite Buddhism being in general decline in both those regions. Styles could vary considerably between the different regions of Tibet as well as the wider region where tangkas were painted. Within Tibet the regions nearer Nepal and China were often more influenced by those styles.Bhutanese tangkaswere mainly influenced by Central Tibet. The differentmonastic ordersalso developed somewhat different stylistic characters.

Tibetan painting incorporated many elements from Chinese painting, especially from the 14th century onwards, reaching a peak in the 18th century. One aspect of this was allowing more space and emphasis to the landscape background. In general the style of figures in thangka remains derived from the Indo-Nepalese tradition.[11][12]According toGiuseppe Tucci, by the time of theQing Dynasty, "a new Tibetan art was then developed, which in a certain sense was a provincial echo of the Chinese 18th century's smooth ornate preciosity."[12]Throughout the period the Chinese Imperial court retained diplomatic and other contacts with Tibet for political reasons, but when theManchuQing dynastycame to power court interest in Tibetan Buddhism increased, and many Chinese works in a very refined and elegant style, though eventually becoming rather stiff, were produced by Imperial artists and often sent to Tibet as gifts, influencing local styles. As well as the court style, there was influence from the regions of China near to Tibet.[13]

Tangkas were painted in all the areas where Tibetan Buddhism flourished, which apart from those mentioned already and parts ofHimalayanIndia inArunachal Pradesh,Dharamshala, andLahaul and Spiti districtinHimachal Pradesh. It is also practiced in parts andTuva) andNortheast China.

Other traditions of Buddhist scroll paintings are not usually covered by the term thangka, although they may have many similarities, and descend from the same origins. An example isJapanese painting, where a number of very early examples survive from theNara(710-794) andHeian periods(794 to 1185). Most of these areNational Treasures of Japan.Raigō-zudeveloped as one popular genre, showing theAmidaBuddha accompanied by bodhisattvas welcoming the souls of the faithful to hisWestern Paradise. These were, and still are, carried into the house of a person who was near death.

Process

Tangkas are painted oncottonor silk. The most common is a loosely woven cotton produced in widths from 40 to 58cm (16 - 23inches). While some variations do exist, tangkas wider than 45cm (17 or 18inches) frequently have seams in the support. The paint consists ofpigmentsin a water-solublemediumof animalglue. Both mineral and organic pigments are used. In Western terminology, this is adistempertechnique; although it is often described as a form ofgouache, this is incorrect, and the paint was applied as a warm liquid, mixed shortly before application.[15]

Most old thangka have inscriptions on the back, usually themantraof the deity depicted, but sometimes also information as to later owners, though rarely information about the original commissioner or artist. Sometimes x-rays allow pious inscriptions placed under the paint on the front of the image to be seen. Inscriptions may be made in the shape of astupa, or sometimes other shapes.[16]

The composition of a thangka, as with the majority ofBuddhist art, is highly geometric. Arms, legs, eyes, nostrils, ears, and various ritual implements are all laid out on a systematic grid of angles and intersecting lines. A skilled thangka artist will generally select from a variety of predesigned items to include in the composition, ranging from alms bowls and animals, to the shape, size, and angle of a figure's eyes, nose, and lips. The process seems very methodical, but often requires deep understanding of the symbolism involved to capture the spirit of it.

Thangka often overflow with symbolism and allusion. Because the art is explicitly religious, all symbols and allusions must be in accordance with strict guidelines laid out in Buddhist scripture. The artist must be properly trained and have sufficient religious understanding, knowledge, and background to create an accurate and appropriate thangka:

"Tibetan artexemplifies thenirmanakaya, the physical body of Buddha, and also the qualities of the Buddha, perhaps in the form of a deity. Art objects, therefore, must follow rules specified in the Buddhist scriptures regarding proportions, shape, color, stance, hand positions, and attributes in order to personify correctly the Buddha or Deities."


Buddha Tibetan Thangka Thanka Painting Nepal Gold & Pigments Kalachakra Mandala:
$451

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