Insect Small Bracelet 13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle Synonycha Grandis Clear


Insect Small Bracelet 13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle Synonycha Grandis Clear

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Insect Small Bracelet 13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle Synonycha Grandis Clear:
$10


  • Real13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle - Synonycha grandisspecimen encased in clear oped lucite material. The specimen is crystal clear, transparent and indestructible. Safe, authentic and completely unbreakableproduct put realBeetle right at your of theBeetlebody is1.2 cm(0.5 inch).
  • Weight of thebracelet is7 g and 15 g with packing box.
  • Length of the band is extendable from 14 to 24 cm (5.5 to 9.5 inches).
  • This suits the hands of both females and males of different ages.
  • Nature & Science

    Insect Small Bracelet 13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle Synonycha grandis Clear

    Real13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle - Synonycha grandisspecimen encased in clear oped lucite material. The specimen is crystal clear, transparent and indestructible. Safe, authentic and completely unbreakableproduct put realBeetle right at your fingertips!

    Length of theBeetlebody is1.2 cm(0.5 inch).

    Weight of thebracelet is7 g and 15 g with packing box.

    Length of the band is extendable from 14 to 24 cm (5.5 to 9.5 inches).

    This suits the hands of both females and males of different ages.

    The color and style of the band/cord/string may be different from the picture as we will use different one in each batch of production.

    This is a handmade real animal specimen craft. Each one will be a bit different (specimen size, color and posture) even in the same production batch.
    The pictures in the listing are just for reference as we are selling multiple pieces with same Star Golden Ladybird Beetle - Synonycha grandis

    ColeopteraLinnaeus, 1758 -- beetles, besouro, coléoptères

    PolyphagaEmery, 1886

    CucujiformiaLameere, 1938

    CucujoideaLatreille, 1802

    CoccinellidaeLatreille, 1807 -- coccinelles, ladybird beetles

    CoccinellinaeLatreille, 1807

    SynonychaChevrolat in Dejean, 1837

    Synonycha grandis(Thunberg, 1781)

    Coccinellidae is a family of beetles, known variously as ladybirds (British English, Australian English, South African English), ladybugs (North American English) or lady beetles (preferred by some scientists). The family name comes from its type genus, Coccinella. Coccinellids are found worldwide, with over 5,000 species described, more than 450 native to North America alone. Coccinellids are small insects, ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm (0.04 to 0.4 inches), and are commonly yellow, orange, or scarlet with small black spots on their wing covers, with black legs, head and antennae. A very large number of species are mostly or entirely black, gray, or brown, however, and may be difficult for non-entomologists to recognize as coccinellids (and, conversely, there are many small beetles that are easily mistaken as such, like tortoise beetles).

    They are generally considered useful insects as many species feed on aphids or scale insects, which are pests in gardens, agricultural fields, orchards, and similar places. Some people consider seeing them or having them land on one's body to be a sign of good luck to come, and that killing them presages bad luck. A few species are pests in North America and are typically predators on Hemiptera such as aphids and scale insects, though members of the subfamily Epilachninae are herbivores, and can be very destructive agricultural pests (e.g., the Mexican bean beetle). They are also known to eat certain plants and crops when no other food is present, making them a possible pest to farmers and gardeners. While they are often used as biological control agents, introduced species of ladybirds (such as Harmonia axyridis or Coccinella septempunctata in North America) can outcompete and displace native coccinellids, and become pests in their own right.

    Coccinellids are often brightly coloured to ward away potential predators. This defense works because most predators associate bright colours (especially orange and black or yellow and black) with poison and other unpleasant properties. This phenomenon is called aposematism. In fact, most coccinellids are indeed poisonous to smaller predators, such as lizards and small birds; however, a human would have to eat several hundred coccinellids before feeling any effects. Adult coccinellids are able to reflex-bleed hemolymph from their leg joints, releasing their oily yellow toxin with a strong repellent smell. This becomes quite obvious when one handles a coccinellid roughly.

    Most Coccinellids mate in Spring or Summer and the female lays a cluster of eggs (numbering from a few to a few hundred, depending on species) as near as possible to an aphid colony. In most species these eggs hatch into a larval state within a week. This state lasts 10–15 days, and they then go into a pupal stage before becoming an adult coccinellid. The entire life cycle of the Coccinellid is only 4–7 weeks. Most ladybird species are univoltine, producing only one generation a year, although some are bivoltine.

    Coccinellids lay extra infertile eggs with the fertile eggs. These appear to provide a backup food source for the larvae when they hatch. The ratio of infertile to fertile eggs increases with scarcity of food at the time of egg laying.

    Some species are migratory and form large aggregations during the migratory period. They also form large aggregations when they go into hibernation in Winter.

    Habitats

    Most coccinellids are beneficial to gardeners in general. In the Spring, one could usually find a ladybird in a vegetable garden feeding on aphids. As in many insects, ladybirds in temperate regions enter diapause during the Winter. Some species (e.g., Hippodamia convergens) gather into groups and move to higher land, such as a mountain, to enter diapause. Ladybirds are usually found where aphids or scale insects are, and they lay their eggs near their prey, to increase the likelihood the larvae will find the prey easily. Since aphids and scale insects occur nearly everywhere in the world, ladybirds are also cosmopolitan.

    Coccinellids as household pests

    Although native species of coccinellids are typically considered benign, in North America the Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis), introduced in the twentieth century to control aphids on agricultural crops, has become a serious household pest in some regions owing to its habit of overwintering in structures. It is similarly acquiring a pest reputation in Europe, where it is called the "Harlequin Ladybird" (see main article "Asian lady beetle" for discussion).

    Coccinellids in popular culture

    Coccinellids are and have for very many years been favourite insects of children. The insects had many regional names (now mostly disused) such as the lady-cow, may-bug, golden-knop, golden-bugs (Suffolk); and variations on Bishop-Barnaby (Norfolk dialect) - (Barney, Burney) Barnabee, Burnabee, and the parts of Northern Europe, tradition says that one's wish granted if a ladybird lands on oneself. In Italy, it is said by some that if a ladybird flies into one's bedroom, it is considered good luck. In central Europe, a ladybird crawling across a girl's hand is thought to mean she will get married within the year. In some cultures they are referred to as lucky bugs.***


    Item SpecificsCountry of Manufacture ChinaMaterial ResinType OrnamentBrand UnbrandedCountry/Region of Manufacture ChinaUPC Does not applyModified Item NoHandmade Yes
    Payment

    Payment: By Paypal

    Shipping cost

    Free shipping cost.

    We send the goods to USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand, EU countries and some other European and Asian countries by E-express, a kind of fast postal service by Hong Kong Post. It usually takes about 6 to 10 working days for delivery.

    We send the goods to other countries by registered airmail and will take about 8 to 14 working days for delivery.

    Return policy

    Returns: We accept returns with any reason in 30 days.

    Messages

    We will answer buyer messages within 24 hours during working days.

    Nature & Science

    Custom Item Insect Small Bracelet 13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle Synonycha grandis Clear

    Real13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle - Synonycha grandisspecimen encased in clear oped lucite material. The specimen is crystal clear, transparent and indestructible. Safe, authentic and completely unbreakableproduct put realBeetle right at your fingertips!

    Length of theBeetlebody is1.2 cm(0.5 inch).

    Weight of thebracelet is7 g and 15 g with packing box.

    Length of the band is extendable from 14 to 24 cm (5.5 to 9.5 inches).

    This suits the hands of both females and males of different ages.

    The color and style of the band/cord/string may be different from the picture as we will use different one in each batch of production.

    This is a handmade real animal specimen craft. Each one will be a bit different (specimen size, color and posture) even in the same production batch.
    The pictures in the listing are just for reference as we are selling multiple pieces with same Star Golden Ladybird Beetle - Synonycha grandis

    ColeopteraLinnaeus, 1758 -- beetles, besouro, coléoptères

    PolyphagaEmery, 1886

    CucujiformiaLameere, 1938

    CucujoideaLatreille, 1802

    CoccinellidaeLatreille, 1807 -- coccinelles, ladybird beetles

    CoccinellinaeLatreille, 1807

    SynonychaChevrolat in Dejean, 1837

    Synonycha grandis(Thunberg, 1781)

    Coccinellidae is a family of beetles, known variously as ladybirds (British English, Australian English, South African English), ladybugs (North American English) or lady beetles (preferred by some scientists). The family name comes from its type genus, Coccinella. Coccinellids are found worldwide, with over 5,000 species described, more than 450 native to North America alone. Coccinellids are small insects, ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm (0.04 to 0.4 inches), and are commonly yellow, orange, or scarlet with small black spots on their wing covers, with black legs, head and antennae. A very large number of species are mostly or entirely black, gray, or brown, however, and may be difficult for non-entomologists to recognize as coccinellids (and, conversely, there are many small beetles that are easily mistaken as such, like tortoise beetles).

    They are generally considered useful insects as many species feed on aphids or scale insects, which are pests in gardens, agricultural fields, orchards, and similar places. Some people consider seeing them or having them land on one's body to be a sign of good luck to come, and that killing them presages bad luck. A few species are pests in North America and are typically predators on Hemiptera such as aphids and scale insects, though members of the subfamily Epilachninae are herbivores, and can be very destructive agricultural pests (e.g., the Mexican bean beetle). They are also known to eat certain plants and crops when no other food is present, making them a possible pest to farmers and gardeners. While they are often used as biological control agents, introduced species of ladybirds (such as Harmonia axyridis or Coccinella septempunctata in North America) can outcompete and displace native coccinellids, and become pests in their own right.

    Coccinellids are often brightly coloured to ward away potential predators. This defense works because most predators associate bright colours (especially orange and black or yellow and black) with poison and other unpleasant properties. This phenomenon is called aposematism. In fact, most coccinellids are indeed poisonous to smaller predators, such as lizards and small birds; however, a human would have to eat several hundred coccinellids before feeling any effects. Adult coccinellids are able to reflex-bleed hemolymph from their leg joints, releasing their oily yellow toxin with a strong repellent smell. This becomes quite obvious when one handles a coccinellid roughly.

    Most Coccinellids mate in Spring or Summer and the female lays a cluster of eggs (numbering from a few to a few hundred, depending on species) as near as possible to an aphid colony. In most species these eggs hatch into a larval state within a week. This state lasts 10–15 days, and they then go into a pupal stage before becoming an adult coccinellid. The entire life cycle of the Coccinellid is only 4–7 weeks. Most ladybird species are univoltine, producing only one generation a year, although some are bivoltine.

    Coccinellids lay extra infertile eggs with the fertile eggs. These appear to provide a backup food source for the larvae when they hatch. The ratio of infertile to fertile eggs increases with scarcity of food at the time of egg laying.

    Some species are migratory and form large aggregations during the migratory period. They also form large aggregations when they go into hibernation in Winter.

    Habitats

    Most coccinellids are beneficial to gardeners in general. In the Spring, one could usually find a ladybird in a vegetable garden feeding on aphids. As in many insects, ladybirds in temperate regions enter diapause during the Winter. Some species (e.g., Hippodamia convergens) gather into groups and move to higher land, such as a mountain, to enter diapause. Ladybirds are usually found where aphids or scale insects are, and they lay their eggs near their prey, to increase the likelihood the larvae will find the prey easily. Since aphids and scale insects occur nearly everywhere in the world, ladybirds are also cosmopolitan.

    Coccinellids as household pests

    Although native species of coccinellids are typically considered benign, in North America the Asian lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis), introduced in the twentieth century to control aphids on agricultural crops, has become a serious household pest in some regions owing to its habit of overwintering in structures. It is similarly acquiring a pest reputation in Europe, where it is called the "Harlequin Ladybird" (see main article "Asian lady beetle" for discussion).

    Coccinellids in popular culture

    Coccinellids are and have for very many years been favourite insects of children. The insects had many regional names (now mostly disused) such as the lady-cow, may-bug, golden-knop, golden-bugs (Suffolk); and variations on Bishop-Barnaby (Norfolk dialect) - (Barney, Burney) Barnabee, Burnabee, and the parts of Northern Europe, tradition says that one's wish granted if a ladybird lands on oneself. In Italy, it is said by some that if a ladybird flies into one's bedroom, it is considered good luck. In central Europe, a ladybird crawling across a girl's hand is thought to mean she will get married within the year. In some cultures they are referred to as lucky bugs.***


    Payment

    Payment: By Paypal

    Shipping cost

    Free shipping cost.

    We send the goods to USA, Canada, UK, Australia, New Zealand, EU countries and some other European and Asian countries by E-express, a kind of fast postal service by Hong Kong Post. It usually takes about 6 to 10 working days for delivery.

    We send the goods to other countries by registered airmail and will take about 8 to 14 working days for delivery.

    Return policy

    Returns: We accept returns with any reason in 30 days.

    Messages

    We will answer buyer messages within 24 hours during working days.


    Copy rights of All right reserved.




    Insect Small Bracelet 13 Star Golden Ladybird Beetle Synonycha Grandis Clear:
    $10

    Buy Now



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