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Original 1868 The Corset And The Crinoline,freaks Of Fashion,illustrated 1st Ed For Sale

Original 1868 The Corset And The Crinoline,freaks Of Fashion,illustrated 1st Ed

ANTIQUE, Exceedingly rare, original Victorian era, hard cover book, 1868. Illustrated, with green covers with fancy gold gilt stampings. Title is THE CORSET AND THE CRINOLINE, A Book Of Modes and Costumes..From Remote Periods to Present Times. This book is also known as Freaks Of Fashion. Author is W.B.L. or, Lord, William Barry. Published and printed in 1868 by Ward, Lock, and Tyler, London. Title page also states: With 54 Full Page and other Engravings. This book is rarely seen outside of a museum collection, and the original hard cover almost never comes to market. Fascinating, oft times humorous, detailed historical treatise on the history of corsetry, waist cinchers, crinolines, corset fashions and more. A survey of the interesting and at times odd range of undergarments that whittled the female waist to its most slender proportions. Made of wood, whalebone, steel, hoops, and more...tight laces had a gripping influence on shaping the figures of women from ancient Greece to 19th-century Vienna........

. Thank you for looking, and please see our sales for more antique books from this fashion designer's private collection of rare books and vintage costume related books.


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The book has 224 numbered pages of text, plus pages in the back with advertisements. The book measures 8 1/2" by 7". Green covers with gold gilt stampings on the front cover and the spine. Shows age but is a very rare book, and I give more details below. NOTE: I list the illustrations, I list the chapters and contents of each chapter, and some quotes from the book. Please scroll down for more details.


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A quote from the end of the book: "Fashions have altered, times have changed, hooped petticoats have been in turn honoured and banished, just as the fickle goddess of the mirror has decreed. Still, as an arrow shot in the air returns in time to earth, so surely does the hooped jupon return to power after a temporary estrangement from the world of gaiety. The illustration on page 223 represents the last new form of crinoline and there can be no doubt that its open form of front is a most important and note (223) worthy improvement. Preceding this engraving, we have an illustration representing two ladies in the costume of the present season arranged over ''the glove-fitting corset'' and ''Zephyrina Jupon,'' for patterns of both of which we are indebted to the courtesy of Messrs. Thomson and Co., the inventors and manufacturers. It is the custom with some authors to uphold the claims of nature in matters relating to human elegance, and we admit that nature in her own way is particularly charming, so long as the accessories and surroundings are in unison. But in the human heart everywhere dwells an innate love of adornment, and untaught savages, in their toilet appliances and tastes, closely resemble the belles of highly-civilized communities. We have already referred to the crinoline petticoats worn by the Tahitian girls when they were first seen by the early navigators. The frilled ruff (224) which so long remained a high court favorite during the Elizabethan period (and which, if we mistake not, will again have its day) was as well known to the dusky beauties of the palm-clad, wave-lashed islands of the Pacific, when Cook first sailed forth to discover new lands, as it was to the stately and proud dames of Venice. Beneath, we place side by side types of savage elegance and refined taste. Where the one begins and the other ends, who shall say?"


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A quote from the end of the book: "Fashions have altered, times have changed, hooped petticoats have been in turn honoured and banished, just as the fickle goddess of the mirror has decreed. Still, as an arrow shot in the air returns in time to earth, so surely does the hooped jupon return to power after a temporary estrangement from the world of gaiety. The illustration on page 223 represents the last new form of crinoline and there can be no doubt that its open form of front is a most important and note (223) worthy improvement. Preceding this engraving, we have an illustration representing two ladies in the costume of the present season arranged over ''the glove-fitting corset'' and ''Zephyrina jupon,'' for patterns of both of which we are indebted to the courtesy of Messrs. Thomson and Co., the inventors and manufacturers. It is the custom with some authors to uphold the claims of nature in matters relating to human elegance, and we admit that nature in her own way is particularly charming, so long as the accessories and surroundings are in unison. But in the human heart everywhere dwells an innate love of adornment, and untaught savages, in their toilet appliances and tastes, closely resemble the belles of highly-civilised communities. We have already referred to the crinoline petticoats worn by the Tahitian girls when they were first seen by the early navigators. The frilled ruff (224) which so long remained a high court favourite during the Elizabethan period (and which, if we mistake not, will again have its day) was as well known to the dusky beauties of the palm-clad, wave-lashed islands of the Pacific, when Cook first sailed forth to discover new lands, as it was to the stately and proud dames of venice. Beneath, we place side by side types of savage elegance and refined taste. Where the one begins and the other ends, who shall say?"


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The subject which we have treated here is a sort of figurative battle-field, where fierce contests have been waged from time to time for ages; and, notwithstanding the determined assaults of the attacking hosts, the contention and its cause remain pretty much as they were at the commencement of the war. We in the matter remain strictly neutral, merely performing the part of the public's ''own correspondent,'' making it our duty to gather together such extracts from despatches, both ancient and modern, as may prove interesting or important, to take note of the vicissitudes of war, mark its various phases, and, in fine, to do our best to lay clearly before our readers the historical facts-experiences and arguments-relating to the much-discussed ''Corset question.'' As most of our readers are aware, the leading journals especially intended for the perusal of ladies have been for many years the media for the exchange of a vast number of letters and papers touching the use of the Corset. The questions relating to the history of this apparently indispensable article of ladies' attire, its construction, application, and influence on the figure have become so numerous of late that we have thought, by embodying all that we can glean and garner relating to Corsets, their wearers, and the various costumes worn by ladies at different periods, arranging the subject-matter in its due order as to dates, and at the same time availing ourselves of careful illustration when needed, that an interesting volume would result. No one, we apprehend, would be likely to deny that, to enable the fairer portion of the civilised human race to follow the time-honoured custom of presenting to the eye the waist in its most slender proportions, the Corset in some form must be had recourse to. Our information will show how ancient and almost universal its use has been, and there is no reason to anticipate that its aid will ever be dispensed with so long as an elegant and attractive figure is an object worth achieving. Such being the case, it becomes a matter of considerable importance to discover by what means the desirable end can be acquired without injury to the health of those whose forms are being restrained and moulded into proportions generally accepted as graceful, by the use and influence of the Corset. It will be our duty to lay before the reader the strictures of authors, ancient and modern, on this article of dress, and it will be seen that the animadversions of former writers greatly exceed modern censures, both in number and fierceness of condemnation. This difference probably arises from the fact of Corsets of the most unyielding and stubborn character being universally made use of at the time the severest attacks were made upon them; and there can be no reasonable doubt that much which was written in their condemnation had some truth in it, although accompanied by a vast deal of fanciful exaggeration. It would also be not stating the whole of the case if we omitted here to note that modern authors, who launch sweeping anathemas on the very stays by the aid of which their wives and daughters are made presentable in society, almost invariably quote largely from scribes of ancient date, and say Iittle or nothing, of their own knowledge. On the other hand, it will be seen that those writing in praise of the moderate use of Corsets take their facts, experiences, and grounds of argument from the every-day life and general custom of the present period. The Crinoline is too closely associated with the Corset and with the mutable modes affected by ladies, from season to season, to be omitted from any volume which treats of Fashion. The same facts, indeed, may be stated of both the Crinoline and the Corset. Both appear to be equally indispensable to the woman of the present period. To make them serve the purposes of increased cleanliness, comfort, and grace, not only without injury to the health, but with positive and admitted advantage to the physique these are the problems to be solved by those whose business it is to minister to the ever-changing taste and fashion of the day.


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Contents

CHAPTER I: The corset: Origin. Use amongst Savage Tribes and Ancient People. Slenderness of Waist esteemed in the East, Ceylon, Circassia, Crim Tartary, Hindustan, Persia, China, Egypt, Palestine: The origin of the Corset - The Indian hunting-belt - Reduction of the figure by the ancient inhabitants of Polenqui - Use of the Corset by the natives of the Eastern Archipelago - Improvements in construction brought about by the advance of civilisation - Slenderness of waist esteemed a great beauty in the East - Earth-eating in Java - Figure-training in Ceylon - The beauties of Circassia, their slender waists and Corsets - Elegant princesses of Crim Tartary - Hindoo belles - Hindoo ideas of beauty - Elegance of figure highly esteemed by the Persians - Letter from a Chinese gentleman (Woo-tan-zhin) on slender waists - Researches amongst the antiquities of Egypt - Fashions of the Egyptian ladies - The Corset in use among the Israelitish ladies - The elegance of their costume, bridal dress, etc. - Scriptural references.

CHAPTER II: The Corset according to Homer, Terentius. The Strophium of Rome, and the Mitra of Greece. The Peplus. A Roman Toilet, Bath, and Promenade. General Luxury. Cleopatra's Jewels. Tight-lacing on the Tiber: ...... Homer the first ethnic writer who speaks of an article of dress allied to the Corset - The cestus or girdle of Venus - Terentius, the Roman dramatist, and his remarks on the practice of tight-lacing - The use of the strophium by the ladies of Rome, and the mitra of the Grecian belles - The peplus as worn by the ancients - Toilet of a Roman lady of fashion - Roman baths - Fashionable promenades of Ancient Rome - Boundless luxury and extravagance - Cleopatra and her jewels - The taper waists and tightlacing of the ancient Roman ladies - Conquest of the Roman Empire.

CHAPTER III: Frankish Fashions. The Monks and the Corset. Corsets worn by Gentlemen as well as Ladies in the Thirteenth Century. The Kirtle. Small Waists in Scotland. Chaucer on Small Bodies. The Surcoat. Long Trains. Skirts. Snake-toed Shoes. High-heeled Slippers: The ladies of Old France - Their fashions during the reign of King Pepin - Revival of the taste for small waists - Introduction of '' cottes hardies'' - Monkish satire on the Corset in England in the year 1043, curious MS. relating to - The small waists of the thirteenth century - The ancient poem of Launfal - -The Lady Triamore, daughter of the King of the Fairies - Curious entry in the household register of Eleanor, Countess of Leicester, date 1265 - Corsets worn by gentlemen at that period - The kirtle as worn in England - The penance of Jane Shore - Dress of Blanche, daughter of Edward III - Dunbar's Thistle and Rose - Admiration for small waists in Scotland in the olden time - Chaucer's writings - Small waists admired in his day - The use of the surcoat in England - Reckless hardihood of a determined tailor - The surcoat worn by Marie d'Anjou of France - Italian supremacy in matters of dress - The Medici, Este, and Visconti - Costume of an Italian duchess described - Freaks of fashion in France and Germany - Long trains - Laws to restrain the length of skirts - Snake-toed shoes give place to high-heeled slippers.

CHAPTER IV: Bonnets. Head-dresses, Costumes in the time of Francis I. Pins in France and England. Masks in France. Puffed Sleeves. Bernaise Dress. Marie Stuart. Long Slender Waists. Henry III. of France ''tight-laces.'' Austrian Joseph prohibits Stays. Catherine de Medici and Elizabeth of England. Severe form of Corset. Lawn Ruffs. Starching. Stuffed Hose. Venice Fashions. Elizabeth's False Hair. Stubs on the Ladies. James I. affects Fashion. Garters and Shoe-roses. Dagger and Rapier: ...............The bonnet a canon and sugarloaf headdress - Headdress of the women of Normandy at the present day - Odd dress of King Louis XI. - Return of Charles VIII. from Naples - A golden time for tailors and milliners - General change of fashion - Costumes of the time of Francis I. of France and Maximilian of Germany - General use of pins in France and England - Masks worn in France -Establishment of the empire of Fashion in France - The puffed or bouffant sleeves of the reign of Henry II. - The Bernaise dress - Costume of the unfortunate Marie Stuart - Rich dresses and long slender waists of the period - The tight-lacing of Henry III. of France - The Emperor Joseph of Austria, his edict forofferding the use of stays, and how the ladies regarded it - Queen Catherine de Medici and Queen Elizabeth of England - The severe form of Corsets worn in both France and England - The corps - Steel Corset covers of the period - Royal standard of fashionable slenderness - The lawn ruffs of Queen Bess - The art of starching - Voluminous nether-garments worn by the gentlemen of the period - Fashions of the ladies of Venice - Philip Stubs on the ruff - Queen Elizabeth's collection of false hair - Stubs furious at the fashions of ladies - King James and his fondness for dress and fashion - Restrictions and sumptuary laws regarding dress - Side-arms of the period.

CHAPTER V: Louise de Lorraine. Marie de Medici. Distended Skirts. Hair Powder. Hair à l'enfant. Low Dresses. Louis XIV. High Heels. Slender Waists. Siamese Dress. Charles I. Patches. Elaborate Costumes. Puritan Modes. Tight-lacing and Strait-lacing under Cromwell. Augsburg Ladies: ........Strange freaks of Louise de Lorraine - One of her adventures - Her dress at a royal fête - Marie de Medici - The distended dresses of her time - Hair-powder - Costume a la enfant - Escapade of the young Louis - Low dresses of the period - The court of Louis XIV. of France - High heels, slender waists, and fancy costumes - The Siamese dress - Charles I. of England - Patches introduced - Elaborate costumes of the period - Puritanism, its effect, on the fashions - Fashions in Cromwell's time, and the general prevalence of the practice of tight-lacing - The ladies of Augsburg described by Hoechstetterus.

CHAPTER VI: Louis XV. À la Watteau. Barbers. Fashions under Queen Anne. Diminutive Waists and Enormous Hoop. The Farthingale. The Guardian. Fashions in 1713. Low Dresses. Tight Stays. Short Skirts. A Lady's Maid's Accomplishments. Gay and Ben Jonson on the Bodice and Stays: ...............................Fashion during the reign of Louis XV. - Costumes a la Watteau - An army of barbers - The fashions of England during the reign of Queen Anne - The diminutive waist and enormous hoop of her day - The farthingale: letters in the Guardian protesting against its use - Fashion in 1713 - Low dresses, tight stays, and short skirts: letters relating to - Correspondence touching the fashions of that period from the Guardian - Accomplishments of a lady's-maid - Writings of Gay and Ben Jonson - Their remarks on the ''bodice'' and ''stays.''

CHAPTER VII: Stays or Corset. Louis XVI. Dress in 1776. Severe Lacing. Hogarth. French Revolution. Short waists. Long Trains. Buchan. Jumpers and Garibaldis. Figure training. Back-boards and Stocks. Doctors on Stays. George III. Gentlemens Stays. The Changes of Fashion. The term CRINOLINE not new. South Sea Islanders. Madame la Sante on Crinoline. Starving and Lacing. Anecdote. Wearing the Corset during sleep. American Belles. Illusion Waists. Medicus favours moderate tightlacing. Ladies' Letters on tight-lacing: ...............General use of the word ''stays' after l600 in England-Costume of the court of Louis XVI. - Dress in 1776-The formidable stays and severe constriction then had recourse to - The stays drawn by Hogarth - Dress during the French revolutionary period - Short waists and long trains-Writings of Buchan - Jumper and ''Garibaldis'' - Return to the old practice of tight-lacing - Training of figures: backboards and stocks - Medical evidence in favor of stays - Fashion in the reign of George III. - Stays worn habitually by gentlemen - General use of Corsets for boys on the Continent - The officers of Gustavus Adolphus - The use of the Corset for youths: a letter from a gentleman on the subject of Evidence regarding the wearing of Corsets by gentlemen of the present day - Remarks on the changes of fashion - 'the term ''Crinoline' not new - Crinoline among the South Sea Islanders - Remarks of Madame La Sante on Crinoline and slender waists - Abstinence from food as an assistance to the Corset - Anecdote from the Traditions of Edinburgh - The custom of wearing Corsets during sleep, its growing prevalence in schools and private families: letters relating to - The belles of the United States and their 'illusion waists' - Medical evidence in favour of moderately tight lacing - Letters from ladies who have been subjected to tight-lacing.

CHAPTER VIII: The Austrian Empress. Viennese Waists. London small-sized Corsets. Correspondence of The Queen and the Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine. Lady Morton. Figure-training. Corsets for Young Girls. Early use of well-constructed Corsets. The Boarding-School and the Corset. Letters in praise of tight-lacing. Defences of the Crinoline and the Corset. The Venus de Medici. Fashionably-dressed Statue. Clumsy Figures. Letter from a Tight Lacer. A Young Baronet. A Family Man: ............The elegant figure of the Empress of Austria - Slender waists the fashion in Vienna - The small size of Corsets frequently made in London - Letter from the Queen on small waists - Remarks on the portrait of the Empress of Austria in the Exhibition - Diminutive waist of Lady Morton - General remarks on the figure - Remarks on figure-training by the use of stays - Mode of constructing Corsets for growing girls - Tight-lacing abolished by the early use of well-constructed Corsets - Boarding school discipline and extreme tight-lacing - Letter in praise of tight Corsets - Letter in praise of Crinoline and Corsets - Another letter on boarding-school discipline and figure-training - The waist of fashion contrasted with that of the Venus de Medici - A fashionably-dressed statue - Clumsy figures a serious drawback to young ladies - Letter from a lady, who habitually laces with extreme tightness, in praise of the Corset - Opinions of a young baronet on slender waists; letter from a family man on the same subject.

CHAPTER IX: No elegance without the Corset. Fashion of 1865. Short Waist and Train of 1867. Tight Corset and Short Waist. A form of French Corset. Proportions of Figure and Waist. The Point of the Waist. Older Writers on Stays. Denunciations against Small Waists and High Heels. Alarming Diseases through High Heels. Female Mortality. Corset Statistics. Modern and Ancient Corset: ..............The elegance of dress mainly dependent on the Corset - Fashion and dress of 1865 - The short-waisted dresses and trains of 1867 - Tight Corsets needed for short waists - Letter on the figure - Description of a peculiar form of Corset worn by some ladies of fashion in France - Proportions of the figure and size of the waist considered - The point at which the waist should be formed - Remarks of the older writers on stays - Corsets and high-heeled shoes denounced - Alarming diseases said to be produced by wearing high-heeled shoes - Mortality amongst the female sex not on the increase - Extraordinary statistics of the Corset trade - The Corset of the present day contrasted with that of the olden time.

CHAPTER X: Front-fastening Stays. Thomson's Corset. Stability of front-fastening Corset. De La Garde's Corset. Self-measurement. Viennese Redresseur Corset. Flimsy Corsets. Proper Materials. ''Minet Back'' Corset. Elastic Corsets. Narrow Bands Injurious. The Corset properly applied produces a graceful figure. The Farthingale Reviewed. Thomson's Zephyrina Crinoline. Costume of the Present Season. The claims of Nature. Similitude between the Tahitian Girl and Venetian Lady: Remarks on front-fastening stays - Thomson's glove-fitting Corsets - Plan for adding stability to the front-fastening Corset - De la Garde's French Corset - System of self measurement - The Redresseur Corset of Vienna and its influence on the figures of young persons - Remarks on the flimsy materials used in the manufacture of Corsets - Hints as to proper materials - The ''Minet Back'' Corset described - Elastic Corsets condemned - The narrow bands used as substitutes for Corsets injurious to the figure - Remarks on the proper application of the Corset with the view to the production of a graceful figure - Thomson's Zephyrina Crinoline - Costume of the present season - The claims of Nature and Art considered - The belle of Damara Land.


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List of illustrations THE DAWN OF THE CORSET 11 CIRCASSIAN LADY 15 EGYPTIAN LADY IN FULL SKIRT 18 PERSIAN DANCING GIRL 21 EGYPTIAN LADY IN NARROW SKIRT 24 LADY OF ANCIENT GREECE 32 ROMAN LADY OF RANK (REIGN OF HELIOGABALUS) 39 THE FIEND OF FASHION, FROM AN ANCIENT MANUSCRIPT 43 THE PRINCESS BLANCHE, DAUGHTER OF EDWARD III. 48 LADY OF RANK OF THE THIRTEENTH CENTURY 51 LADY OF THE COURT OF QUEEN CATHERINE DE MEDICI 55 FULL COURT DRESS AS WORN IN FRANCE, 1515 58 LADIES OF FASHION IN THE COSTUME OF 1380 61 NORMAN HEADDRESS OF THE PRESENT DAY 64 LADY OF THE COURT OF CHARLES VIII., 1500 67 LADY OF THE COURT OF MAXIMILIAN OF GERMANY AND FRANCIS OF FRANCE 70 CORSET-COVER OF STEEL WORN IN THE TIME OF CATHERINE DE MEDICI. 71 CORSET-COVER OF STEEL WORN IN THE REIGN OF QUEEN ELIZABETH (OPEN) 72 THE BERNAISE HEADDRESS, AND COSTUME OF MARIE STUART 74 CORSET-COVER OF STEEL WORN IN THE REIGN OF QUEEN ELIZABETH (CLOSED) 76 HENRY III. OF FRANCE AND THE PRINCESS MARGARET OF LORRAINE 77 LADY OF THE COURT OF QUEEN ELIZABETH 80 A VENETIAN LADY OF FASHION, 1560 83 QUEEN ELIZABETH 86 COURT DRESS DURING THE BOYHOOD OFLOUIS XIII. 93 MARIE DE MEDICI 96 FANCY COSTUMES OF THE TIME OF LOUIS XIV. 99 SIAMESE DRESS WORN AT THE COURT OF LOUIS XIV. 102 YOUNG ENGLISH LADY OF FASHION, 1653 105 FANCY DRESS WORN IN THE REIGN OF LOUIS XV. 108 COSTUMES AFTER WATTEAU 111 CRINOLINE IN 1713 114 LOW BODIES AND CURTAILED CRINOLINE 117 COURT DRESS OF THE REIGN OF LOUIS XVI. 125 CLASSIC COSTUME OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTIONARY PERIOD 128 LADY OF FASHION, 1806 131 FASHIONABLE DRESS IN 1824 139 LADY OF FASHION, 1827. 142 LADY OF FASHION, 1830. 145 LADY OF FASHION, 1837. 148 THE CRINOLINE OF SOUTH SEA ISLANDER 151 THE FASHION OF 1865 188 THE FASHION OF 1867 191 CORSET, FORMING BOTH CORSET AND STOMACHER (FRONT) 196 CORSET, FORMING BOTH CORSET AND STOMACHER (BACK) 200 COMMON CHEAP STAY, FASTENED 202 COMMON CHEAP STAY, OPEN 203 THE GLOVE-FITTING CORSET (THOMSON AND CO.) 204 CORSET OF MESSRs.DE LA GARDE, PARIS (FRONT) 205 CORSET OF MESSRs.DE LA GARDE, PARIS (BACK) 208 THE REDRESSEUR CORSET OF VIENNA (WEISS) 211 THE FASHION OF 1868, 222 THE ZEPHYRINA JUPON (THOMSON AND CO.) 223 TAHITIAN DANCING GIRL AND VENETIAN LADY 224

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"Such a work as this would be incomplete without some remarks touching the best means to be applied for the achievement of the desired end, and hence a letter from a lady of great experience, who has paid much attention to the subject, contributed to the Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine, enables us to give the very best possible kind of information viz., that gathered by personal observation. Thus she writes: ''In the numerous communications on the subject of tight-lacing (216) which have appeared in the Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine, but little has been said on the best mode of applying the corset in order to produce elegance of figure. It seems to me that nearly all those who suffer from tight-lacing do so from an injudicious use of the corset, and in such cases the unfortunate corset generally gets all the blame, and not the wearer who makes an improper use of it. I can easily understand that a girl who is full grown, or nearly so, and who has been unaccustomed to wear tight stays, should find it difficult and painful to lace in her waist to a fashionable size; but if the corset be worn at an early age and the figure gradually moulded by it, I know of no terrible consequences that need be apprehended. I would therefore recommend the early use of a corset that fits the figure nicely and no more. Now, simply wearing stays that only fit, will, when a girl is growing, in a great measure prevent the waist from becoming clumsy. If, however, on her reaching the age of fourteen or fifteen, her waist be still considered too large, a smaller corset may be worn with advantage, which should be gradually tightened till the requisite slimness is achieved. I know of so many instances in which, under this system, girls have, when full grown, possessed both a good figure and good health, that I can recommend it with confidence to those parents who wish their children to grow up into elegant and healthy women. As to whether compression of the waist by symmetrical corsets injures the health in any way, opinion seems to be divided. The personal experiences of tight-lacers, as your correspondent Belle has observed, will do more to solve this knotty question than any amount of theory. But whatever conclusion we may come to on this point, there is no denying the fact that very many of the strongest and healthiest women one sees in society habitually practise tight-lacing, and apparently do so with impunity. "

Another quote: "We have heard many complaints lately of the flimsy manner in which corsets of comparatively high price are turned out by their makers, the stitching being so weak that re-sewing is not infrequently needed after a few days' wear. The edges of the whale bones, too, instead of being rounded off and rendered smooth, are often, we find, left as sharp as a knife, causing the coutil or other material to be cut through in a very few days. The eyelet-holes are also made so small and narrow at the flanges that no hold on the material is afforded, and even the most moderate kind of lacing causes them to break from their hold, fall out, and leave a hole in the material of which the corset is made, which if not immediately repaired by working round in the old-fashioned way rapidly enlarges, frays out, and runs into an unsightly hole. Corset-makers should see that the circle of metal beyond the orifice through which the lace passes is sufficiently wide to close down perfectly (213) on the fabric, and retain a firm hold of it; if they do not do so, the old worked eyelet-hole is preferable to the stud, notwithstanding the neat appearance of the stud and the apparent advantage it has over the old plan. A form of corset made without lacing-holes, known as the ''Minet Back,'' with which many of our readers will no doubt be familiar, and which was extensively worn in France some few years ago, is still to be obtained of some few makers in England. This has a row of short strong loops sewn just beyond each back whalebone. Through these pass from top to bottom, on each side of the back, a long round bar of strong whalebone, which is secured in its place by a string passing through a hole made in its top to the upper loop of each row. The lace (a flat silk one) was passed through the spaces between the loops, and was tightened over the smooth round whalebone, thus enabling the wearer not only to lace with extreme tightness without danger to the corset, but admitting of its almost instant removal by slightly slackening the lace and then drawing out one of the bars, which immediately sets the interlacing free from end to end. We are rather surprised that more of these corsets are not worn, as there are numerous advantages attendant on them. Our space will not admit of our more than glancing en passant at the various inventions which have from time to time been brought to the notice of the public. By some inventors the use of elastic webbing or woven india rubber cloth was taken advantage of, and great stress was laid on the resilient qualities of the corsets to which it was applied. But it must never be lost sight of that all materials of an elastic nature, when fitted tightly to the figure, not only have the power of expanding on the application of force, but are unceasingly exercising their own extensive powers of contraction. Thus, no amount of custom could ever adapt the waist to the space allotted to it, as with the elastic corset it is changing every second, and always exercising constriction even when loosely laced. The narrow bands hollowed out over the hips may be, as some writers on the subject have stated, adapted for the possessors of very slight figures (214) who ride much on horseback; but many ladies of great experience in the matter strongly condemn them as being inefficient and calculated to lead to much detriment to the figure. Thus writes a correspondent to the Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine: ''As one of your correspondents recommends the waistbands in lieu of corsets, I have during the last three weeks made a trial of them, and shall be glad if you will allow me to express my opinion that they are not only disadvantageous but positively dangerous to the figure. Your correspondent says that ordinary corsets, if drawn in well at the waist, hurt a woman cruelly all the way up. I can only say that if she finds such to be the case the remedy is in her own hands. If ladies would only take the trouble to have their stays made to measure for them, and have plenty of room allowed round the chest, not only would the waist look smaller, but no discomfort would be felt such as H. W. describes. Young girls should always be accurately fitted, but it is, I have found, a mistake to have their corsets too flimsy or elastic. I quite agree that they should be commenced early-indeed, they usually are so, and thus extreme compression being unnecessary, the instances brought forward by the lady who commenced the discussion and by Nora must, I think, be looked upon as exceptional cases.


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CONDITION is overall FAIR to GOOD. Fair outside, shows age, wear, scuffing, corner bumps, etc...PLEASE SEE THE PHOTOS. This book is exceedingly rare in any condition. Age and wear, corner bumps, etc to the covers, fading, gilt still shows title well....spine has wear, fading and darkening, edge wear to top and bottom. Covers are attached, but are loose as the hinges are cracked....binding is shaken, a few loose pages but all are present. . .but the book is complete.....has no musty odors.... Paper is good, aged in color but not brittle, might be a page or two with a tiny edge chip, but no rips or tears. Some pages have marks or smudges, not too bad. In the "gutter", that is, the place in the middle where the pages meet, in some pages (more towards the very back) there is some spotting, yellowing, soiling, paper dryness, binding weak, etc....The book has noted age but is still a rare book in any condition.......offered with a low opening offer.....NOTE: If you seek perfection, this may not be for you. However if you seek and very scarce book for your collection that rarely comes up for sale, please consider this. .Thank you.

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Original 1868 The Corset And The Crinoline,freaks Of Fashion,illustrated 1st Ed

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