President Grover Cleveland's Wife 1880's Large Trade Card Picture Frames


President Grover Cleveland's Wife 1880's Large Trade Card Picture Frames

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President Grover Cleveland's Wife 1880's Large Trade Card Picture Frames:
$29


Large original 1880's Victorian trade card, or store display card, showing President Grover Cleveland's wife, Frances Folsom. The front of the card has a beautiful illustration of the First Lady.
The card advertises Picture Frames and Looking Glasses made by John H. Braceland, 321 North Eight Street, between Vine and Callowhill Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Pictures the same size of this card framed in Gold, Bronze, Polished Oak or Cherry, with glass, sold for 22 cents. The company also sold Oil Paintings; Engravings; Etchings; Oleographs; Pastels; Photograph Albums; Easels; Brackets; Fancy Art Goods; etc.Nice overall condition. Some minor corner wear. A few minor paper scuffs on Mrs. Cleveland's chin and dress. No tape. Printed on cardboard stock.
The card measures a large 9 inches tall and about 5 inches wide.
From Wikipedia:
Frances Clara Folsom Cleveland Preston (July 21, 1864– October 29, 1947) was married to the President of the United States Grover Cleveland and was the First Lady of the United States from 1886 to 1889 and again from 1893 to 1897. Becoming First Lady at age 21, she remains the youngest wife of a sitting president.

Frances Clara Folsom was born in Buffalo, New York to Emma Harmon and her husband Oscar Folsom, a lawyer who was a descendant of the earliest European settlers of Exeter, New Hampshire[1].

All of Frances Cleveland's ancestors were from England and settled in what would become Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire, eventually migrating to western New York.[2] She was their only child to survive infancy (a sister, Nellie Augusta, died before her first birthday). She originally had the first name Frank (named for an uncle), but later decided to adopt the feminine variant Frances.[3] A longtime close friend of Oscar Folsom, Grover Cleveland, met his future wife shortly after she was born and he was 27 years old. He took an avuncular interest in her, buying her a baby carriage and otherwise doting on her as she grew up. When her father died in a carriage accident on July 23, 1875 without having written a will, the court appointed Cleveland administrator of his estate.[2] This brought Cleveland into still more contact with Frances, then age 11.

She attended Central High School in Buffalo and Medina High School in Medina, New York then Wells College in Aurora, New York. While she was in college, Cleveland's feelings for her took a romantic turn. He proposed by letter in August 1885, soon after her graduation, but they didn't announce their engagement until five days before their wedding.

In honor of Frances Cleveland, Cleveland Hall was constructed in 1911 on the Wells College campus. Originally a library, the building currently holds foreign language classes, as well as classes in women's studies, and a food pantry.[4]

Frances was the first First Lady to give birth to a child while her husband was President. The Clevelands had three daughters and two sons:

  • Ruth Cleveland (1891–1904)– Born in New York City during the interval between her father's terms as president. She died at the age of 12 of diphtheria and is buried in Princeton, New Jersey. The Baby Ruth candy bar was allegedly named for her.
  • Esther Cleveland (1893–1980)– Born September 9, 1893, at the White House in Washington, DC. On March 14, 1918, at Westminster Abbey, she married Captain William Sidney Bence Bosanquet of the Coldstream Guards of the British Army. Their daughter was Philippa Foot (1920–2010), the British philosopher.
  • Marion Cleveland (1895–1977)– Born in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, she attended Columbia University Teachers College and married, first, Stanley Dell and second, in 1926, John Amen, a New York lawyer. From 1943 to 1960 she was community relations director of the Girl Scouts of the USA (Girl Scouts of the United States prior to 1947) at its headquarters in New York.
  • Richard Folsom Cleveland (1897–1974)– lawyer. Born in Princeton, New Jersey, he served as an officer in the Marines during World War I, graduated from Princeton University in 1919, earned a master's degree in 1921 and graduated from Harvard Law School in 1924. He practiced law in Baltimore with the law firm of Semmes, Bowen, and Semmes and defended Whittaker Chambers against Alger Hiss's libel suit.
  • Francis Grover Cleveland (1903–1995)– actor. Born in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, he graduated from Harvard University with a degree in drama. After teaching for a time in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he went to New York to enter the theater.

After her husband's death in 1908, Cleveland remained in Princeton, New Jersey. On February 10, 1913, at the age of 48, she married Thomas J. Preston, Jr., a professor of archaeology at her alma mater, Wells College.[5] She was the first presidential widow to remarry. She was vacationing at St. Moritz, Switzerland, with her daughters Marion and Esther and her son Francis when World War I erupted in August 1914. They returned to the United States via Genoa on October 1, 1914.[6] Soon afterwards, she became a member of the pro-war National Security League, becoming its director of the Speaker's Bureau and the "Committee on Patriotism through Education" in November 1918. Her "proto-fascist" inclinations alarmed many in the organization, and she was forced to resign on December 8, 1919. She also, surprisingly, campaigned against women's suffrage, contending that "women were yet intelligent enough to vote". In May 1913 she was elected as vice president of the "New Jersey Association Opposed to Woman's Suffrage" and served as the president for the Princeton chapter.[7]

During the Great Depression of the 1930s, she led the Needlework Guild of America in its clothing drive for the poor.[8]

While staying at her son Richard's home for his 50th birthday in Baltimore, Cleveland died in her sleep at the age of 83 on October 29, 1947.[9] She was buried in Princeton Cemetery next to President Cleveland, her first husband.


Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who was the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, the only president in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office (1885–1889 and 1893–1897).[b] He won the popular vote for three presidential elections—in 1884, 1888, and 1892—and was one of two Democrats (with Woodrow Wilson) to be elected president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933.

Cleveland was the leader of the pro-business Bourbon Democrats who opposed high tariffs, Free Silver, inflation, imperialism, and subsidies to business, farmers, or veterans. His crusade for political reform and fiscal conservatism made him an icon for American conservatives of the era.[2] Cleveland won praise for his honesty, self-reliance, integrity, and commitment to the principles of classical liberalism.[3] He fought political corruption, patronage, and bossism. As a reformer, Cleveland had such prestige that the like-minded wing of the Republican Party, called "Mugwumps", largely bolted the GOP presidential ticket and swung to his support in the 1884 election.[4]

As his second administration began, disaster hit the nation when the Panic of 1893 produced a severe national depression, which Cleveland was unable to reverse. It ruined his Democratic Party, opening the way for a Republican landslide in 1894 and for the agrarian and silverite seizure of the Democratic Party in 1896. The result was a political realignment that ended the Third Party System and launched the Fourth Party System and the Progressive Era.[5]

Cleveland was a formidable policymaker, and he also drew corresponding criticism. His intervention in the Pullman Strike of 1894 to keep the railroads moving angered labor unions nationwide in addition to the party in Illinois; his support of the gold standard and opposition to Free Silver alienated the agrarian wing of the Democratic Party.[6] Critics complained that Cleveland had little imagination and seemed overwhelmed by the nation's economic disasters—depressions and strikes—in his second term.[6] Even so, his reputation for probity and good character survived the troubles of his second term. Biographer Allan Nevins wrote, "[I]n Grover Cleveland, the greatness lies in typical rather than unusual qualities. He had no endowments that thousands of men do not have. He possessed honesty, courage, firmness, independence, and common sense. But he possessed them to a degree other men do not."[7] By the end of his second term, public perception showed him to be one of the most unpopular U.S. presidents, and he was by then rejected even by most Democrats.[8] Today, Cleveland is considered by most historians to have been a successful leader, generally ranked among the upper-mid tier of American presidents.


I will be listing many other Victorian Trade Cards from a 40 year old collection so please check out my other listings.
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President Grover Cleveland's Wife 1880's Large Trade Card Picture Frames:
$29

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