1863 Civil War Display Newspaper W Confederate Negro Soldier Engraving Frnt Page


1863 Civil War Display Newspaper W Confederate Negro Soldier Engraving Frnt Page

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1863 Civil War Display Newspaper W Confederate Negro Soldier Engraving Frnt Page:
$45


1863 CIVIL WAR display newspaper with a front page engraving and report depicting two CONFEDERATE NEGRO SOLDIERS standing picket for the REBEL ARMY #fb914

Pleasevisit our store for printed on the front pageother FANTASTIC Americana, Antiquarian Books and Ephemera.

SEE PHOTO-----COMPLETE, ORIGINALNEWSPAPER, theHarper's Weekly Illustrated 10, 1863with fantasticCIVIL WAR, Black Americana and NEGRO SOLDIER history!

A COMPELLING addition to any fine, Black Americana or CIVIL WARcollection.

Confederate and State militia Commanders in response to immediate threats in the form of Union raids…". Dr. Leonard Haynes, an African-American professor at Southern University, stated, "When you eliminate the black Confederate soldier, you’ve eliminated the history of the South."

The "Richmond Howitzers" were partially manned by black militiamen. They saw action at 1st Manassas (or 1st Battle of Bull Run) where they operated battery no. 2. In addition two black "regiments", one free and one slave, participated in the battle on behalf of the South. "Many colored people were killed in the action", recorded John Parker, a former slave.

At least one Black Confederate was a non-commissioned officer. James Washington, Co. D 34th Texas Cavalry, "Terrell’s Texas Cavalry" became it’s 3rd Sergeant. In comparison, The highest-ranking Black Union soldier during the war was a Sergeant Major.

Free black musicians, cooks, soldiers and teamsters earned the same pay as white confederate privates. This was not the case in the Union army where blacks did not receive equal pay. At the Confederate Buffalo Forge in Rockbridge County, Virginia, skilled black workers "earned on average three times the wages of white Confederate soldiers and more than most Confederate army officers ($350-$600 a year).

Dr. Lewis Steiner, Chief Inspector of the United States Sanitary Commission while observing Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson’s occupation of Frederick, Maryland, in 1862: "Over 3,000 Negroes must be included in this number

[Confederate troops]. These were clad in all kinds of uniforms, not only in cast-off or captured United States uniforms, but in coats with Southern buttons, State buttons, etc. These were shabby, but not shabbier or seedier than those worn by white men in the rebel ranks. Most of the Negroes had arms, rifles, muskets, sabers, bowie-knives, dirks, etc., and were manifestly an integral portion of the Southern Confederate Army."

Frederick Douglas reported, "There are at the present moment many Colored men in the Confederate Army doing duty not only as cooks, servants and laborers, but real soldiers, having musket on their shoulders, and bullets in their pockets, ready to shoot down any loyal troops and do all that soldiers may do to destroy the Federal government and build up that of the rebels."

Harper's Weekly, A Journal of Civilization was an American political magazine based in New York City. Published by Harper & Brothers from 1857 until 1916, it featured foreign and domestic news, fiction, essays on many subjects, and humor, alongside illustrations. It carried extensive coverage of the American Civil War, including many illustrations of events from the war. During its most influential period, it was the forum of the political cartoonist Thomas Nast.

Harper's Weekly was the most widely read newspaper in the United States throughout the period of the Civil War. So as not to upset its wide readership in the South, Harper's took a moderate editorial position on the issue of slavery prior to the outbreak of the war. Publications that supported abolition referred to it as "Harper's Weakly". The Weekly had supported the Stephen A. Douglas presidential campaign against Abraham Lincoln, but as the American Civil War broke out, it fully supported Lincoln and the Union. A July 1863 article on the escaped slave Gordon included a photograph of his back, severely scarred from whippings; this provided many readers in the North their first visual evidence of the brutality of slavery. The photograph inspired many free blacks in the North to enlist.

Some of the most important articles and illustrations of the time were Harper's reporting on the war. Besides renderings by Homer and Nast, the magazine also published illustrations by Theodore R. Davis, Henry Mosler, and the brothers Alfred and William Waud.

In 1863, George William Curtis, one of the founders of the Republican Party, became the political editor of the magazine, and remained in that capacity until his death in 1892. His editorials advocated civil service reform, low tariffs, and adherence to the gold standard.

Very Good condition. This listing includesthecomplete entire original newspaper.VINTAGE BOOKS AND FINE ART stands behind all of the items that we sell with a no questions asked, money back guarantee. Every item we sell is original printed on the date indicated at the beginning of its description, unless clearly stated as a reproduction in the header AND text body. U.S. buyers pay calculatedpriority postage which includes waterproof plastic and a heavy cardboard flat to protect your purchase from damage in the mail. International postage is quoted when we are informed as to where the package is to be sent. We do combine postage (to reduce postage costs) for multiple purchases sent in the same package.We acceptpayment by PAYPAL.We ship packagesdaily.This is trulya pieceOF HISTORY that YOU CAN OWN!


1863 Civil War Display Newspaper W Confederate Negro Soldier Engraving Frnt Page:
$45

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